For the best security, it’s recommended that you have a unique password for every single account, but that’s difficult for those of us with the memory of a goldfish. This is why it’s worth checking out the best password manager options. 

With both free and paid-for password managers available, there are plenty of options to keep all of your passwords secure, allowing you to use one simple master password (or even biometric login) to access all of your many, many accounts. 

And while Google Password Manager comes with Chrome at default, our testing shows it’s a very poor option in terms of security. So which is the best password manager to use?

Our team of experts have reviewed a slew of password managers this year, testing the likes of ease of use, security and additional features. And so we’ve decided to list the top scoring options right here.

We make sure to test each password manager with a variety of computer and mobile operating systems, while checking out every available feature. Can’t find a password manager you like right now? Then check back later, as we’ll be updating this article with more password manager options once we review them. 

And if you’re on the lookout for more computer software, check out our Best VPN and Best AntiVirus lists.

How we test

Learn more about how we test password managers

We test each password manager ourselves on a variety of computer and mobile operating systems.

We carry out comparative feature analysis against industry standards and rival products, and test security and convenience settings such as default logout behaviour and offline access.

Bitwarden

Best overall password manager

Pros

  • Unlimited free tier
  • Inexpensive paid tiers
  • Easy to use
  • TOTP password generation

Bitwarden is our top recommended free and paid-for password manager right now. Its free tier is fully functional with excellent security, allowing you to store an unlimited number of passwords on all kinds of devices. 

We also think the paid-for tier represents great value, offering high-end features such as emergency access contact, secure file storage and additional two-factor authentication options. 

During testing, we were also impressed with how easy it is to use, and shouldn’t prove intimidating to non-technical users. The downside to this is that it doesn’t offer as many customisable security features as the likes of KeePass.

Nevertheless, we think Bitwarden hits a great middle ground between being both accessible and fully featured, and so is our top recommended password manager for the vast majority of people. And since it has a free tier, you can try before you buy.

Reviewer: K.G. Orphanides
Full Review: Bitwarden Review

1Password

Best password manager for non-technical users

Pros

  • Excellent interface
  • Can share passwords with anyone
  • In-app TOTP password generation

1Password is, in our opinion, the best password manager for non-technical users. Bitwarden is still great in this area too, but we reckon 1Password just about pips it thanks to its friendlier interface.

Our testing shows that 1Password doesn’t offer as many granular controls as Bitwarden and KeePass, but that shouldn’t be a problem for those who don’t like to tinker.

1Password is only available via a paid-for subscription but offers plenty of features to justify the cost. There’s a Travel Mode vault that can store important documents for an upcoming trip, oodles of two-factor authentication options and the capability to share passwords with anyone, even if they aren’t fellow 1Password subscribers.

We were impressed with the level of security here too, operating as a zero-knowledge service so your data can’t be snooped even if 1Password is hacked. So if you’re looking for the most friendly interface possible, while benefiting from plenty of paid-for features, 1Password is the one to go for.

Reviewer: K.G. Orphanides
Full Review: 1Password Review

KeePass

Best password manager for customisable security

Pros

  • Entirely free and open source
  • Highly customisable
  • Wide range of third-party apps and extensions
  • In-app TOTP password generation

Cons

  • No integrated sharing
  • More hands-on configuration than most rivals

KeePass is the absolute best password manager option for those who crave sophisticated and customisable security, with almost every single feature offering granular-level tweaking. This may be a little intimidating for the average person, but is the perfect option for those experienced with technology. 

Bizarrely, KeePass is completely free to use and yet still offers a fantastic range of features, including biometric logins and ‘autotype’ to bypass anti-pasting password entry. 

Our testing showed there to be a couple of major features missing though, with group folders and password sharing notably absent. If those features are important to you, then we suggest checking out Bitwarden instead. 

But if you’re happy to look past those omissions and want ultimate configurability from your password manager then KeePass is your best bet.  

Reviewer: K.G. Orphanides
Full Review: KeePass Review

LastPass

Best free option for non-technical users

Pros

  • Unusually wide range of account recovery options
  • Easy password sharing

Cons

  • No desktop clients
  • Free accounts must choose between mobile or desktop access

LastPass is arguably the best known password manager on this list, and while it doesn’t quite have enough features to be ranked as our number one recommendation, it’s still a leading free option for those who want an accessible and friendly interface. 

During testing, we were impressed with how simple the interface was, resulting in a frictionless user experience. There are a few important security features buried in the settings menu that is disabled at default, but this is easy enough to fix. 

We also appreciated the unusually wide range of recovery options, while it’s also very simple to share passwords with other LastPass users. It also supports biometric unlock and unlock via smartphone app prompts for those who can’t be bothered typing in a password. 

There are a few issues with LastPass though, as it’s lacking a desktop app and requires a bit of meddling with the settings to ensure top-notch security. Otherwise, this is one of our top recommended free password manager options, especially if you want an easy-to-understand interface. 

Reviewer: K.G. Orphanides
Full Review: LastPass Review

NordPass

Best password manager bundle with a VPN

Pros

  • Polished interface
  • Excellent free tier

Cons

  • Not as many features as some rivals

NordPass is a great password manager that’s accessible for non-technical users, but it’s simply not as good as rivals such as Bitwarden and 1Password. We still think it’s worth subscribing if you use other Nord services though, especially if you’re able to get a bundle deal with the excellent NordVPN.

NordPass offers support for two-factor authentication, while enabling you to store contact information, credit cards and notes. Paying customers can also grant full or limited password access to anyone else who subscribes to the service. 

It doesn’t have quite as many features as its main rivals, yet still provides excellent security since this is a zero-knowledge account – even hackers shouldn’t be able to access your data. One issue that may prove problematic is the fact you can’t log into the desktop app without an internet connection, which is unlike other password manager options.

There are a number of niggling issues that prevent NordPass from offering a better experience than other password managers. But we still think it’s a great option, especially if you want to bundle it up with other Nord services such as its fantastic VPN. 

Reviewer: K.G. Orphanides
Full Review: NordPass Review

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FAQs

Is LastPass still the best password manager?

We think LastPass is a great option, but we reckon Bitwarden is currently the overall best password manager, whether you’re using the free version or paying for a subscription.

What password manager is the safest?

All of the password managers on this list are really safe, generally acting as a zero-knowledge service so your data can’t be snooped on. But KeePass offers the best configurability so you can have your security features set up exactly to your liking.

What are the disadvantages of a password manager?

Having one master password to all of your online accounts can be a little risky if your master password is easily hackable. Make sure that your master password is strong (with capitals, lowercase, numbers etc.) as otherwise all of your accounts could be compromised.

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